THANK YOU, VOTERS

VOTERS APPROVE MAY 4 BOND ELECTION
Preliminary election results show Lewisville ISD stakeholders approve all three props in May 4 Bond election.
VISIT LISD.NET FOR MORE INFORMATION

Even if approved, the LISD tax rate will not change.

 

 

Even if approved, the LISD tax rate will not change.

Watch for all the details:

Election Day is May 4

Registered voters residing within Lewisville ISD boundaries will be asked to consider a total of three propositions that would generate additional funding to conduct maintenance, repairs and renovations at various athletics and recreation facilities across the district, as well as all five existing high school stadiums and the district’s two Aquatic Centers.

Early voting runs from April 22 – 30.

Information Session

LISD conducted five information sessions so voters could learn more about the seven propositions for Lewisville ISD that will be on the ballot this November.

Couldn’t make it to an info session, or want a quick review of what was presented? Watch the virtual version to learn more about what is included on the ballot for LISD, and what it means for taxpayers.

DID YOU KNOW?

LISD serves 13,000 students out of 27,000 secondary students in the way of athletics activities, making up 820 sports teams across its 127 square mile footprint.

From $1.23 in 2023 to $1.13 in 2024

Over the last seven years, the district has reduced the overall tax rate by 27 cents, dropping the total tax rate from $1.40 in 2018 to its current rate of $1.13.

LISD is able to take on these bonds with NO CHANGE to the LISD tax rate.

LISD Tax Rate History

The Buckets of School Funding

How School Debt Affects the Tax Rate

Voting Information

Anyone who is a registered voter and lives within the Lewisville ISD boundaries is eligible to vote in the May 2024 Bond election.

  • Monday, April 22 – Tuesday, April 30: Early Voting
  • Saturday, May 4: Election Day

Polling Locations

Find your polling locations, times and dates here:

Denton County | Tarrant County

View the Voting Guide:

LISD Bond Voting Guide 2024

DID YOU KNOW?

LISD maintains 37 various athletic fields, 23 tracks, more than 60 tennis courts, 2 aquatic centers, and more than 50 locker rooms across 25 high school and middle school campuses.

WHAT IS A BOND?

DID YOU KNOW?

On an average Friday night during the fall, more than 6,000 students from a variety of groups fill our stadiums, with an average of 3,000 community members in attendance. 

WHAT'S INCLUDED?

PROP A: Natatorium

(Eastside Aquatics Center and Westside Aquatics Center)
Proposition A: $16,250,000
Maintenance, repairs and renovations at the Eastside Aquatic Center and Westside Aquatic Center.

PROP B: Athletics & Recreation Facilities

Proposition B: $65,585,000
Maintenance, repairs and renovations at athletics facilities consisting of locker rooms and field houses; tennis courts; baseball / softball facilities; middle school competition fields; high school practice fields; and concession areas.

PROP C: Stadiums

Proposition C: $19,999,000
Maintenance, repairs and renovations to existing stadiums at Hebron High School, Flower Mound High School, The Colony High School, Marcus High School and Lewisville High School.

FAQ

What is a school bond?

A school bond is a promise to pay back a certain amount of money that is being borrowed for a specific use, and it will be paid back with interest. There are state and federal laws and regulations on how school districts issue bonds and how the bond proceeds can be used. With voter approval, school districts may issue bonds to pay for construction, acquisition and renovations of school buildings; acquisition of sites for school buildings; purchasing equipment for school buildings and buying buses. School bonds are used to help pay for costly school facilities projects.

How is a school bond passed?

A school bond must be approved by a majority of voters who live within the school district’s boundaries.

When was the last time Lewisville ISD had a bond election?

LISD held a bond election in fall 2023, and voters approved two of the six bond proposals on the ballot, in addition to the VATRE. The two approved bond proposals made up 83% of the funds the district brought forth to voters in the fall.

Prior to 2023, bond elections were also held in 2017, 2008, 2005 and 2001. The history of these bond projects are available for review on the district’s bond Web site.

What is different about this bond election and why was it necessary if voters just approved bond projects in Nov?

The Board has decided to ask voters to consider the maintenance and repair projects from the fall election during the May 4, 2024 election, in addition to field renovations for baseball and softball facilities across LISD’s five high schools, three middle school competition fields, and five practice fields at each high school.

The three propositions in the spring election total $101 million. The total for projects not approved in the fall election was $199.4 million.

The district is not asking voters to consider the 100-Yard Indoor Multipurpose Facilities at each high school, which voters did not approve in the fall election.

Why can't funds approved in the 2023 bond be used for projects proposed in this bond?

As a result of the 86th Texas Legislative Session in 2019, school districts are now required to consider whether the projects to be funded through a bond election are classifed as what the Texas Education Code now refers to as “general purpose” or as “special purpose” projects. A few examples of special purposes are the construction, acquisition, or equipping of a stadium with seating capacity for more than 1,000 spectators; a natatorium; and another recreational facility other than a gymnasium, playground, or play area. Separate propositions for these special projects were included in the 2023 bond but those propositions were not approved by voters. Funds approved in the 2023 bond must be used solely for projects that were included in the propostions that were approved by voters.

Will the LISD tax rate change if these bond proposals are approved?

LISD’s debt management policies have helped to pay down existing debt and made it so that all existing and expected debt will be repaid with no increase to the I&S (debt service) tax rate. The current I&S tax rate is $0.38 and is expected to remain at $0.38 even as bonds are issued to pay for projects proposed in the 2024 bond.

How can I find out if Lewisville ISD been a good steward of bond dollars?

The Lewisville ISD Board of Trustees is committed to providing a safe and engaging learning environment and managing resources in a fiscally responsible way. LISD’s bond ratings are the highest ratings a public entity may receive by Fitch and Standard & Poor’s rating agencies. All items promised in the 2017 bond have been addressed and/or are in progress. To date, approximately $29M in additional and unplanned projects were approved by the board due to bond project savings and interest earned. For more details view reporting available on the district’s Finance Dashboard.

Is any of the proposed bond funding dedicated to teachers or instruction?

About eighty percent of Lewisville ISD’s yearly budget is spent on salaries and benefits, which leaves very little to pay for major capital projects, such as new buildings, additions and renovations, land, technology, buses, and equipment, among other items. Therefore, the Board asks voters for permission to sell bonds to fund major projects.

Why do school districts need money from bond proposals, instead of using the funding they already receive?

Since 2019 school districts are required to separate “special purpose” projects from “general purpose” projects and draft ballot orders accordingly. LISD “special purpose” projects are Proposition C for technology and Propositions D-G for athletics projects. LISD has voluntarily separated bonds for special purposes in the past to give the community of voters more options.

If there will be no tax rate increase, why does the ballot include this statement: "this is a tax increase"?

The bond proposition authorizes the district to levy a tax to pay for the new bonds. Bond holders wouldn’t purchase the bonds without this pledge. The tax increase clause is required by law because issuing new debt extends payments over a longer period of time. So while the projects in the bond can be completed with no tax rate increase, taxpayers will be helping LISD pay off those bonds for a longer period of time.

How are projects chosen to be included in a bond proposal?

Projects are chosen by evaluation using the Facilities Assessment document. Age is one of the main criteria, but also considers any relevant work order history and evaluation by the facilities team. The projects are then prioritized for start and completion based on these evaluation scores. Additionally, the Board and district administrators recently reconvened the The One Vision Task Force to hear input about how to address the maintenance, repairs and renovations left outstanding as a result of the fall election.

How do the propositions work? Do I just vote for the one I like? Or can I vote FOR or AGAINST each one?

The ballot will list each of the three propositions separately and voters can choose FOR or AGAINST for each proposition. By law requests for funds to construct or improve large stadiums, performing arts and recreation facilities, and natatoriums must be in a separate ballot proposition. Texas Education Code, Section 45.

Who gets to buy the bonds and at what interest rate?

The bonds will be publicly offered and will be available to anyone who wants to buy them. They will just need to contact their broker when the district goes to market.

Will any of the proposed projects affect future M&O costs?

Any of the projects proposed that are a replacement of an existing aging component or system will save M&O funds. For example, if an HVAC unit fails and, due to its age, it can no longer be repaired or would be fiscally irresponsible to repair, that unit must be replaced with M&O funds. Reminder, M&O funds are used for daily operating costs such as teacher salaries, utlities, and other maintenance tasks, for example. As building components age, major projects will need to be addressed using M&O funds if bond funds are not available. Additionally, replacing aging building systems with newer components can reduce M&O operating costs and utility costs.

Only truly new buildings or additions would add to M&O costs. The only projects proposed in this category are the new locker rooms at Flower Mound HS Baseball and Softball, and new locker rooms at Marcus HS Baseball. These buildings would be small in square footage, so it would not be a large increase to M&O.

When you replace turf, is it as expensive as the original install?

No. The original installation of a synthetic turf field includes a lot of underground prep and a special underground drainage system including gravel and drain piping. When only the synthetic turf itself is up for replacement, all of that underground work can remain as-is. In this bond package, The Colony HS Softball Turf replacement seems very similar in price to the new Synthetic Turf Softball Fields at the other High Schools due to when the project would begin in the proposed Bond. The new turf fields would be done closer to the beginning of the Bond, whereas The Colony HS softball turf is not needed until the end. So there are five years of compound inflation added to the cost of The Colony HS softball turf replacement.

What are the benefits of a synthetic turf field vs natural grass?

The majority of the studies regarding artifical turf will state that artificial turf is more expensive than natural grass, however, annual maintenance on a synthetic turf field is significantly less by approximately $30,000 to $50,000 per year. That is a savings for the District’s M&O budget. In addition, LISD coaches, athletes, and parent volunteers spend approximately 20 hours a week in the season to maintain the grass fields. Each field has to be watered, drug and circulated correctly, and must be raked, edged, and chalked daily. The life of synthetic turf is 8-10 years, and studies show that the ability to use the surfaces more than triples (compared to natural grass) due to resistance to wear from continued use and very little impact from weather.

Synthetic turf:

  • Provides more consistent playing surface, non-abrasive, and shock absorbent
  • Is not subject to cancellations or delays due to weather (Baseball and softball programs missed approximately 40% of scheduled practices during the 2023 season due to field flooding and conditions. Home games are often moved to the opponent’s or neighboring district’s field for games.)
  • Eliminates the need to bus students to fields in other districts
  • Conserves water (every square meter conserves 350 gallons per year)
  • Does not need for fertilizers, perticides, sodd, seeding, dirt for re-leveling, sprinkler and irrigation systems, and lawn mowers

When factoring in the cost of time into the equation, the amount of use per dollar spent over time is very close between the two surfaces. Turf fields have the potential to generate revenue for the district due to the ability to rent out highly sought after turf areas.

How can those interested in joining One Vision Task Force indicate/apply?

Individuals interested in joining the Task Force can apply at LISD.net/OneVision.

PROP A - Aquatic Centers

$16,250,000

Maintenance, repairs and renovations to the existing LISD Eastside and Westside Aquatic centers, which are home to our high school swim, dive and water polo teams. LISD Aquatic centers are also used by second grade classes for water safety instruction. These projects would address maintenance and repairs to existing facilities built by previous bond funds and do not include new construction of any facility.

These facilities are open to the community for lap swim, swimming lessons, birthday parties and club sports such as synchronized swimming, water polo, and youth swim clubs; and routinely host UIL competitions, and even national and international swim meets, serving as a source of revenue for the district and an economic driver for the community.

Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as no longer allowing rentals at these facilities within the community, and potentially closing the facilities.

20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair – Eastside Aquatic Center

The Eastside Aquatic Center is a 38,900 square foot natatorium built in 2006. If approved, the entire facility will be renovated, including the following components:

  • Fire Suppression System
  • HVAC/Pool Heating System
  • Roofing System
  • Pool Filtration System
  • Pool Plaster Repairs
  • Flooring
  • Doors
  • Video Scoreboard
  • Starting Platforms
  • Locker Rooms
Life Cycle Building Component Replacements – Westside Aquatic Center

The Westside Aquatic Center is a 59,000 square foot natatorium built in 2014. If approved the following components will be replaced.

  • Pool Liner of Small Pool
  • Bulkhead Surfacing
  • Video Scoreboard

Prop A Example Projects

Pool Filtration

Several systems at the aquatics centers are at the end of their useful life, including the pool filtration system at the Eastside Aquatics Center (EAC). The pool must be backwashed at least once every three weeks by turning these knobs (pictured) which often break because of rust.

Pool Surfaces

The aging filtration and HVAC systems cause minerals and compounds in the pools to eat away at the pool surfaces and liners, requiring surface replacements more frequently.

Starting Platforms

Starting platforms are used for LISD’s swim and dive programs, and the EAC platforms are at the end of their useful life, losing the textured surface which affects traction and grip.

Aquatics Scoreboard

The current scoreboard does not function for Water Polo matches. The sport was an addition to official UIL competitions in 2022, and LISD currently has girls and boys water polo teams at three high schools.



PROP B - Athletics & Recreation

$65,585,000

Maintenance, repairs and renovations at athletics facilities including locker rooms and field houses; tennis courts; baseball and softball facilities; and concession areas.

20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair

LISD’s athletic facilities are subject to the 20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair process. Facilities slated for a 20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair project are selected based on needs identified from the Facilities Assessment Study, input from program leadership and the Facilities Review Committees.

This bond would fund Life Cycle Maintenance and Repairs for the following facilities:

  • Lewisville HS Boys Track Locker Room
  • Hebron HS Field House
  • Lewisville HS Killough Softball Facilities
  • Hebron HS Baseball and Softball Facilities 

Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as relocation of games, sharing locker rooms and facilities with other teams or programs, and potentially closing facilities and/or facility components.

    Athletics Life Cycle Building Component Replacements

    Major components that have exceeded their usable life are replaced to ensure the safety of student athletes and coaches, and to make more opportunities for students to participate in athletic programs.

    • The Colony HS Softball Turf Replacement
    • Baseball Field Lighting 
      • Flower Mound HS 
      • Hebron HS 
      • Lewisville HS 
      • Marcus HS 
      • The Colony HS 
    • Softball Field Lighting
      • Flower Mound HS 
      • Hebron HS 
      • Lewisville HS 
      • Marcus HS

    Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as relocation of games, and altering competition schedules to day time games or different days of the week to allow for daylight.

    • Tracks (not inside a stadium)
      • Briarhill
      • Downing
      • Forestwood
      • Lamar
      • LHS Harmon
      • LHS Killough
      • Shadow Ridge

    Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as relocating meets and practices; and potentially closing tracks.

    • Lewisville HS Indoor Athletic Center
      • Heaters
      • Turf
      • Roof
    • The Colony HS Indoor Athletic Center
      • Turf
      • Roof

    Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as potentially closing facilities and/or facility components.

      Tennis Courts

      Resurfacing:

      • Flower Mound HS
      • Marcus HS
      • The Colony HS

      Fencing:

      • The Colony HS

      Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as no longer allowing rentals at these facilities within the community, and potentially closing the facilities and/or facility components.

      New Construction or Renovations

      New Locker Rooms at Flower Mound HS Baseball and Softball

      New Locker Rooms at Marcus HS Baseball

      New Lewisville HS Baseball Concession and Restroom Renovations

      Baseball and Softball Field Renovations

      Convert Flower Mound HS Baseball & Softball to turf

      Convert Hebron HS Baseball & Softball to turf

      Convert Lewisville HS Baseball & Softball to turf

      Convert Marcus HS Baseball & Softball to turf

      Convert The Colony HS Baseball to turf

      Middle School Competition Field Renovations

      Convert Shadow Ridge MS to turf

      Convert Griffin MS to turf

      Convert LHS Harmon 9th & 10th Grade Center to turf

      High School Practice Field Renovations

      Convert Flower Mound HS to turf

      Convert Hebron HS to turf

      Convert Lewisville HS to turf

      Convert Marcus HS to turf

      Convert The Colony HS to turf

      Prop B Example Projects

      Baseball & Softball Field Renovations

      Baseball and softball programs missed approximately 40% of scheduled practices during the 2023 season due to field flooding and conditions. Home games are often moved to the opponent’s or neighboring district’s field for games.

      Non-Stadium Track Replacements

      The seven non-stadium tracks included in this bond proposal have reached the end of their useful life, which is approximately 20 years for asphalt tracks and 10 years for synthetic surfaces.

      Non-Stadium Track Replacements

      The seven non-stadium tracks included in this bond proposal have reached the end of their useful life, which is approximately 20 years for asphalt tracks and 10 years for synthetic surfaces.

      Tennis Courts

      Included in this bond proposal is the resurfacing for three high school tennis courts, and fencing for one. These tennis courts face flooding throughout the season, and have cracks, holes and tears in the surfaces.

      Tennis Courts

      Included in this bond proposal is the resurfacing for three high school tennis courts, and fencing for one. These tennis courts face flooding throughout the season, and have cracks, holes and tears in the surfaces.

      PROP C - Stadiums

      $19,999,000

      Maintenance, repairs and renovations to all five existing high school stadiums. LISD is one of the few ISDs in Texas that has five full competition level campus-based stadiums. Stadiums are used for football games, track & field, soccer, band, drill team and community events.

      New stadiums are not included in these projects. All stadium projects are for repairs, maintenance and improvements to existing stadiums.

      Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as altering competition schedules to day time games or different days of the week, relocating games and potentially closing facilities and/or facility components.

      20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair

      LISD’s stadium buildings, including the press box, restrooms, concessions, HVAC in concessions, and locker rooms, are subject to the 20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair process. Facilities slated for a 20-Year Life Cycle Maintenance and Repair project are selected based on needs identified from the Facilities Assessment Study, input from program leadership and the Facilities Review Committees.

      If Prop C is approved, stadium buildings at the following high schools will be renovated:

      • Flower Mound HS
      • Hebron HS

      Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as closure of concession stands, restrooms and potentially the relocation of games without access to game operations conducted from the press box.  

        Life Cycle Building Component Replacements

        When a singular major component reaches the end of its usable life, but the total facility is not scheduled for a complete renovation, the facility is scheduled for a Component Replacement. Components slated for replacement are selected based on needs identified from the Facilities Assessment Study, input from individual departments and the Facilities Review Committees.

        If approved the scoreboards and tracks will be replaced at:

        • Flower Mound HS Stadium
        • Hebron HS Stadium
        • Lewisville HS Stadium
        • The Colony HS Stadium

        Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as relocation of games where there is not an operable scoreboard as required by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) to host competitions.

          New LED lighting at all five High School Stadiums

          If approved, existing stadium lighting will be replaced with more efficient LED lighting at all five high school stadiums. The upgrade to LED lighting would provide increased lighting levels and instant-on capability for improved safety of players and spectators.  LED lighting also typically results in a 40-70% decrease in energy consumption and requires less maintenance and fewer replacements.

          Without funds to address these projects, the LISD Board of Trustees would face alternative circumstances such as altering competition schedules to day time games, moving games to different days of the week to allow for daylight, or relocation of games.

          Prop C Example Projects

          Scoreboard Replacements

          During a 2023 varsity football game, the scoreboard at TCHS stopped communicating with the clock. An LISD staff member stood on a lift (pictured) for the second half of the game with a remote control to keep the clock running. Four high school stadium scoreboards would be replaced if the bond is approved.

          Lighting Replacements

          During a 2024 soccer game, the lights failed, requiring all players and attendees to evacuate the stadium for safety until the lights powered back up. All five high school’s stadium lighting would be replaced with LED lighting with instant-on capability. LED lighting also typically results in a 40-70% decrease in energy consumption and requires less maintenance and fewer replacements.

          Track Replacements

          Included in this bond proposal is the replacement of four high school stadium tracks, three of which were last replaced in ‘12, and one in ‘13. The average lifespan of a synthetic track is 10 years. Normal wear and aging causes the stadium synthetic tracks to rip or tear, requiring patchwork, and too many patches over time causes unlevel areas.

          Track Replacements

          Included in this bond proposal is the replacement of four high school stadium tracks, three of which were last replaced in ‘12, and one in ‘13. The average lifespan of a synthetic track is 10 years. Normal wear and aging causes the stadium synthetic tracks to rip or tear, requiring patchwork, and too many patches over time causes unlevel areas.

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